Open Access: A Collective Ecology for AAA Publishing in the Digital Age

Authors: Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Dominic Boyer, John Hartigan and Marisol de la Cadena

Abstract: Just over a year ago Cultural Anthropology went Open Access. It has been an exhilarating experience, which has seen the journal engage new publics and conversations as well as explore new intellectual and editorial possibilities. For those involved in the running of the journal, it has also demanded a steep learning curve. We, as members of the board of the Society for Cultural Anthropology, thought it would be a good idea to put some of these lessons down in writing while responding to a recent memorandum (5/4/15) to section presidents, journal editors, and section treasurers, which recapitulated the AAA’ history of scholarly publishing. As we write, Michael Chibnik (the editor-in-chief of AA), has published an editorial expressing his hesitation about an open-access solution for American Anthropologist.1 We take this opportunity to reply to Chibnik’s text too.

We offer here three brief reflections on why our experience with Cultural Anthropology has reassured us that Open Access is the future of scholarly publishing. First, we draw attention to the fact that Open Access offers perhaps the most robust model for managing the AAA journals’ portfolio in accordance with its history of collective responsibility. Second, we offer some insights into the changing landscape of scholarly publishing in the digital age. Last, we remind readers that Open Access is, perhaps above all other things, a moral and political decision.

Citation: Corsín Jiménez, Alberto, Boyer, Dominic, Hartigan, John and de la Cadena, Marisol . “Open Access: A Collective Ecology for AAA Publishing in the Digital Age.” Dispatches, Cultural Anthropology website, May 27, 2015. https://culanth.org/fieldsights/684-open-access-a-collective-ecology-for-aaa-publishing-in-the-digital-age

 

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