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Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

Authors: Ellen Collins, Caren Milloy, and Graham Stone

Abstract: This guide explores concerns expressed in public evidence given by researchers, learned societies and publishers to inquiries in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and also concerns expressed by researchers working with the OAPEN-UK project. We have also identified a number of common questions and have drafted answers, which have been checked by experts including Creative Commons. The guide has been edited by active researchers, to make sure that it is relevant and useful to academics faced with making decisions about publishing. It is available under a CC BY license.

Citation: Ellen Collins, Caren Milloy, and Graham Stone. “Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors.” JISC Collections.

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Source: Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

Peer Review and Replication Data: Best Practice from Journal of Peace Research

Authors: Nils Petter Gleditsch, Ragnhild Nordås, & Henrik Urdal

Abstract: Journal of Peace Research is an independent, interdisciplinary, and international journal devoted to the study of war and peace. It is owned by the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) and published on contract with Sage.Its articles range across all the social sciences, although a large majority of its authors now have their main training in political science. The international character of the journal is visible in the composition of the editorial committee and the authorship. The journal has long been a leader among the journals in political science and international relations in making research data publicly available, and is a pioneer in publishing dataset in the form of “special data features.”

Citation: Gleditsch, N. P., Nordås, R., & Urdal, H. (2017). Peer Review and Replication Data: Best Practice from Journal of Peace Research. College & Research Libraries, 78(3), 267–271.

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Source: Peer Review and Replication Data: Best Practice from Journal of Peace Research

Open-access mega-journals: The future of scholarly communication or academic dumping ground? A review.

Authors: Valerie Spezi, Simon Wakeling, Stephen Pinfield, Claire Creaser, Jenny Fry, Peter Willett

Abstract: Open-access mega-journals (OAMJs) represent an increasingly important part of the scholarly communication landscape. OAMJs, such as PLOS ONE, are large scale, broad scope journals that operate an open access business model (normally based on article-processing charges), and which employ a novel form of peer review, focussing on scientific “soundness” and eschewing judgement of novelty or importance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the discourses relating to OAMJs, and their place within scholarly publishing, and considers attitudes towards mega-journals within the academic community.

Citation: Valerie Spezi, Simon Wakeling, Stephen Pinfield, Claire Creaser, Jenny Fry, Peter Willett. (2017) “Open-access mega-journals: The future of scholarly communication or academic dumping ground? A review”, Journal of Documentation, Vol. 73 Iss: 2, pp.263 – 283.

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Source: Open-access mega-journals: The future of scholarly communication or academic dumping ground? A review: Journal of Documentation: Vol 73, No 2

Bakhtin, digital scholarship and new publishing practices as carnival

Anna Mary Cooper, Jenna Condie

Abstract: Digital scholarship is causing disruptions to established academic practices that have long framed how we share knowledge and do research. The web is increasingly vital to all forms of academic scholarship. Using key theoretical concepts from the work of Mikhail Bakhtin, we question what it means in relation to social science when digital scholarship is considered by some to be ‘carnivalesque’ in relation to established academic practice. We draw upon our experiences of editing and curating a collection of works, commonly known as a Book of Blogs published online as Dialogues of sustainable urbanisation: Social Science Research and Transitions to Urban Contexts. The idea of the book was that it would encourage multivoicedness around the topic of sustainable urbanisation. We reflect upon how the Book of Blogs aims to foster a dialogical, unfinalised approach to social sciences research. Seventy chapters or ‘blogs’ from 83 researchers were included in the collection. Such engagement with the Book of Blogs format emphasised that this approach to scholarship spoke to many as a way to be heard. Therefore, we include our reflections on the implications of networked participatory scholarship in the digital sphere for our professional identities and academic careers, alongside example lessons and practicalities of curating and editing a Book of Blogs. We conclude with considering how social theory, particularly a dialogical epistemology, influences our digital scholarship and the ways in which we perform academia.

Cooper, A.M. & Candie, J. (2016). Bakhtin, Digital Scholarship And New Publishing Practices As Carnival. Journal of Applied Social Theory 1 (1).

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Source: Bakhtin, digital scholarship and new publishing practices as carnival

All That Glisters: Investigating Collective Funding Mechanisms for Gold Open Access in Humanities Disciplines

Martin Paul Eve

Abstract: This article sets out the economic problems faced by the humanities disciplines in the transition to gold open access and outlines the bases for investigations of collective funding models. Beginning with a series of four problems, it then details the key players in this field and their various approaches to collective “procurement” mechanisms. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT: The Open Library of Humanities seeks to instigate a collective funding model for an open access megajournal and multijournal system that should enable for a phased transition to a gold open access model that does not require author-facing article processing charges. Libraries who participate then have a governance stake in the platform. NEXT STEPS: The project is currently working towards sustainability and launch. Authors’ pledged papers are being called in and libraries are signing up to the model.

Eve, M.P., (2014). All That Glisters: Investigating Collective Funding Mechanisms for Gold Open Access in Humanities Disciplines. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 2(3), p.eP1131. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1131

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Source: All That Glisters: Investigating Collective Funding Mechanisms for Gold Open Access in Humanities Disciplines

“Facebook for Academics”: The Convergence of Self-Branding and Social Media Logic on Academia.edu

Authors: Brooke Erin Duffy, Jefferson D. Pooley

Abstract: Given widespread labor market precarity, contemporary workers—especially those in the media and creative industries—are increasingly called upon to brand themselves. Academics, we contend, are experiencing a parallel pressure to engage in self-promotional practices, particularly as universities become progressively more market-driven. Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” has grown rapidly by adopting many of the conventions of popular social media sites. This article argues that the astonishing uptake of Academia.edu both reflects and amplifies the self-branding imperatives that many academics experience. Drawing on Academia.edu’s corporate history, design decisions, and marketing communications, we analyze two overlapping facets of Academia.edu: (1) the site’s business model and (2) its social affordances. We contend that the company, like mainstream social networks, harnesses the content and immaterial labor of users under the guise of “sharing.” In addition, the site’s fixation on analytics reinforces a culture of incessant self-monitoring—one already encouraged by university policies to measure quantifiable impact. We conclude by identifying the stakes for academic life, when entrepreneurial and self-promotional demands brush up against the university’s knowledge-making ideals.

Citation:Brooke Erin Duffy and Jefferson D. Pooley. (January 2017). “Facebook for Academics”: The Convergence of Self-Branding and Social Media Logic on Academia.edu. Commons Open Repository Exchange. http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6CD2F

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Measuring Altruistic Impact: A Model for Understanding the Social Justice of Open Access

Authors: Margaret Heller, Franny Gaede

Abstract: Traditional assessment of ways in which open access initiatives and institutional repositories have provided a return on investment normally use pragmatic measures such as download counts and citation benefits. This pragmatic approach misses out on the powerful altruistic impact of improving access to international and/or marginalized communities. Using a frame of social justice, this article considers the importance of developing altruistic measures of repositories, particularly for institutions with missions specifically related to social justice and related themes. Methods: Using web analytics data for search keywords from eight institutions and geographic usage data from nine institutions, the authors were able to determine how well social justice related content is accessed by search engines and how much overall content is accessed internationally, particularly by lower-resourced countries. A social justice term list was developed to permit corpus overlap analysis with each institution’s search keywords, while the World Bank country income lists were used to determine international access by low and low-middle income countries. Results: Universities with mission statements explicitly mentioning social justice or Catholic social teaching had greater overlap with the social justice corpus. Low and low-middle income countries as defined by the World Bank were among the most engaged users. All institutions had at least one social justice search term in their top ten; Marquette University had five. Collection development in social science and environmental sustainability at Loyola University Chicago successfully increased this term overlap year-over-year and increased user engagement as measured by session length. Discussions: The results of this exploratory study indicate that it is possible to use repository data to evaluate the success of an institution’s open access and social justice initiatives. The year-over-year improvement of Loyola’s numbers suggest in addition that it is possible to increase social justice impact through collection development. Performing an analysis of social justice impact can be used as an overall strategy for repository success and outreach on campus, particularly for institutions where social justice is an important part of the campus identity. For repositories in need of further resources, the ability to quantify impact for university administrators and decision-makers may be of use. Conclusion: For institutions with a social justice mission, improving social justice content may improve repository ranking in social justice related search results. Collection development strategies should focus on departments and/or individuals who are working in social justice related areas, which defined broadly could encompass much of an institution. For institutions that emphasize social justice, it may be easier to approach faculty who might not otherwise have an interest in open access issues.

Citation: Heller, M. & Gaede, F. (2016). Appendix A: Social Justice Term Analysis & Appendix B: Social Justice Overlap Template & Geographic Usage. http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/XU5IBN

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Adapting sentiment analysis for tweets linking to scientific papers

Authors: Natalie Friedrich, Timothy D. Bowman, Wolfgang G. Stock, Stefanie Haustein

Abstract: In the context of altmetrics, tweets have been discussed as potential indicators of immediate and broader societal impact of scientific documents. However, it is not yet clear to what extent Twitter captures actual research impact. A small case study (Thelwall et al., 2013b) suggests that tweets to journal articles neither comment on nor express any sentiments towards the publication, which suggests that tweets merely disseminate bibliographic information, often even automatically. This study analyses the sentiments of tweets for a large representative set of scientific papers by specifically adapting different methods to academic articles distributed on Twitter. Results will help to improve the understanding of Twitter’s role in scholarly communication and the meaning of tweets as impact metrics.

Citation: Natalie Friedrich, Timothy D. Bowman, Wolfgang G. Stock, Stefanie Haustein. (2015). Adapting sentiment analysis for tweets linking to scientific papers. arxiv

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The role of handbooks in knowledge creation and diffusion: A case of science and technology studies

Authors: Staša Milojević, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Vincent Larivière, Mike Thelwall, Ying Ding

Abstract: Genre is considered to be an important element in scholarly communication and in the practice of scientific disciplines. However, scientometric studies have typically focused on a single genre, the journal article. The goal of this study is to understand the role that handbooks play in knowledge creation and diffusion and their relationship with the genre of journal articles, particularly in highly interdisciplinary and emergent social science and humanities disciplines. To shed light on these questions we focused on handbooks and journal articles published over the last four decades belonging to the research area of Science and Technology Studies (STS), broadly defined. To get a detailed picture we used the full-text of five handbooks (500,000 words) and a well-defined set of 11,700 STS articles. We confirmed the methodological split of STS into qualitative and quantitative (scientometric) approaches. Even when the two traditions explore similar topics (e.g., science and gender) they approach them from different starting points. The change in cognitive foci in both handbooks and articles partially reflects the changing trends in STS research, often driven by technology. Using text similarity measures we found that, in the case of STS, handbooks play no special role in either focusing the research efforts or marking their decline. In general, they do not represent the summaries of research directions that have emerged since the previous edition of the handbook.

Citation: Staša Milojević, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Vincent Larivière, Mike Thelwall, Ying Ding. (2014). The role of handbooks in knowledge creation and diffusion: A case of science and technology studies. arxiv

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The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator

Authors: Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov

Abstract: There remains something of a disconnect between how research librarians themselves see their role and its responsibilities and how these are viewed by their faculty colleagues. Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov imagine how the research librarian of the future might work, utilising new data science and digital skills to drive more collaborative and open scholarship. Arguably this future is already upon us but institutions must implement a structured approach to developing librarians’ skills and services to fully realise the benefits.

Citation: Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov. (2016). The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator. London School of Economics Impact of Social Sciences Blog.

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