Designing Digital Scholarship Ecologies

Author: Micah Vandegrift

Abstract: Digital Scholarship and Scholarly Communication are transforming the practice of librarianship by 1) integrating throughout the research process, 2) re-positioning the core of libraries, 3) increasing focus on “back of the house” processes/skills, 4) facilitating an outward orientation. Approaching these through the frames of design and ecology offer a useful re-imagining of our current state and possible futures.

Citation: Vandegrift, Micah, 2018. “Designing Digital Scholarship Ecologies”. LIS Scholarship Archive. January 18. osf.io/preprints/lissa/93zvb.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

An annotated bibliography of Digital Scholarship in libraries

Author: Carolyn Moritz

Abstract: This annotated bibliography is to be taken both as a standalone resource and as a supplement to De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto by authors from Florida State University Libraries Office of Digital Research and Scholarship. The manifesto serves as the culmination of an ongoing conversation surrounding the work behind digital scholarship, scholarly communications, invisible labor, and the role of the library and the librarian within it. This bibliography, divided into Definitions of Digital Scholarship, Digital Scholarship in Practice, and Critical and Progressive Librarianship, provides a collaborative snapshot of many of the voices which have informed our theories and practices.

Citation: Moritz, Carolyn, 2017. “An Annotated Bibliography of Digital Scholarship in Libraries”. LIS Scholarship Archive. October 13. osf.io/preprints/lissa/nejzc.

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Source: An annotated bibliography of Digital Scholarship in libraries

Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research

Author: Teresa Schultz

Abstract: The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

Citation: Schultz, Teresa, 2017. “Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research”. LIS Scholarship Archive. July 28. DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/YBDR8

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Open Publication, Digital Abundance, and Scarce Labour

Author: Martin Paul Eve

Abstract: This article examines the challenges of labour provision in the open-access online scholarly publishing environment. Noting that the technological underpinnings of open access imply an abundance, it is also the case that the labour that remains necessary within the publishing processes are based upon a set of economics that are scarce. I here argue, with a demonstration of some of the labours of XML typesetting, that we are unlikely to realise the transformations of abundant proliferation of scholarship without a change and re-distribution of labour functions to authors. The resultant outputs are, I argue, less likely to be machine readable and semantically rich, thereby conflicting with other imagined digital possibilities.

Citation: Eve, Martin P., 2017. “Open Publication, Digital Abundance, and Scarce Labour”. LIS Scholarship Archive. October 25. doi:10.3138/jsp.49.1.26.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Teaching with Data: Visualization and Information as a Critical Process

Authors: Andrew Battista, Jill Conte

Abstract: This chapter is published in the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, Volume Two: Lesson Plans. It focuses on teaching with data, posing visualization and information as a critical process.

Citation: Battista, Andrew,and Jill A Conte 2017. “Teaching with Data: Visualization and Information as a Critical Process”. LIS Scholarship Archive. July 20. doi: 10.17605/OSF.IO/AMS2F

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto

Authors: Carolyn Moritz, Rachel Smart, Aaron Retteen, Matthew Hunter, Sarah Stanley, Devin Soper, Micah Vandegrift

Abstract: Digital scholarship is an evolving area of librarianship. In this piece we propose 10 theses, statements about what this kind of work DOES, rather than trying to define with it IS. We believe that digitally-inflected research and learning, and the characteristics they employ, are essential to the recentering of our profession’s position in/across the academy. We also believe that the “digital scholarship center” has served its time, and that the activities and models for digital scholarship work are core to librarianship. This manifesto is meant to serve as a starting point for a necessary discussion, not an end-all, be-all. We hope others will write and share counter-manifestos, passionate responses, or affirming statements.

Citation: Moritz, Carolyn, Rachel J Smart, Aaron Retteen, Matthew Hunter, Sarah Stanley, Devin Soper, and Micah Vandegrift 2017. “De-centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto”. LIS Scholarship Archive. August 7. DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/T7HFU.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future

Author: Martin Paul Eve

Abstract: If you work in a university, you are almost certain to have heard the term ‘open access’ in the past couple of years. You may also have heard either that it is the utopian answer to all the problems of research dissemination or perhaps that it marks the beginning of an apocalyptic new era of ‘pay-to-say’ publishing. In this book, Martin Paul Eve sets out the histories, contexts and controversies for open access, specifically in the humanities. Broaching practical elements alongside economic histories, open licensing, monographs and funder policies, this book is a must-read for both those new to ideas about open-access scholarly communications and those with an already keen interest in the latest developments for the humanities. This title is also available as Open Access via Cambridge Books Online.

Citation: Eve, Martin P., 2014. “Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future”. Humanities Commons. DOI: 10.17613/M68W2B.

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Source: Humanities Commons

Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives

Authors: Cinthya Ippoliti, Amy Koshoffer, Renaine Julian, Micah Vandegrift, Devin Soper, Sophie Meridien

Abstract:  Research data services promise to advance many academic libraries’ strategic goals of becoming partners in the research process and integrating library services with modern research workflows. Academic librarians are well positioned to make an impact in this space due to their expertise in managing, curating, and preserving digital information, and a history of engaging with scholarly communications writ large. Some academic libraries have quickly developed infrastructure and support for every activity ranging from data storage and curation to project management and collaboration, while others are just beginning to think about addressing the data needs of their researchers. Regardless of which end of the spectrum they identify with, libraries are still seeking to understand the research landscape and define their role in the process. This article seeks to blend both a general perspective regarding these issues with actual case studies derived from three institutions, University of Cincinnati, Oklahoma State University, and Florida State University, all of which are at different levels of implementation, maturity, and campus involvement.

Citation: Ippoliti, C., Koshoffer, A. E., Julian, R., Vandegrift, M., Soper, D., & Meridien, S. (2018, January 12). Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives. Retrieved from 10.17605/OSF.IO/WZ8FN.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Reproducibility Librarianship

Author: Vicky Steeves

Abstract: Over the past few years, research reproducibility has been increasingly highlighted as a multifaceted challenge across many disciplines. There are socio-cultural obstacles as well as a constantly changing technical landscape that make replicating and reproducing research extremely difficult. Researchers face challenges in reproducing research across different operating systems and different versions of software, to name just a few of the many technical barriers. The prioritization of citation counts and journal prestige has undermined incentives to make research reproducible.

While libraries have been building support around research data management and digital scholarship, reproducibility is an emerging area that has yet to be systematically addressed. To respond to this, New York University (NYU) created the position of Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility (RDM & R), a dual appointment between the Center for Data Science (CDS) and the Division of Libraries. This report will outline the role of the RDM & R librarian, paying close attention to the collaboration between the CDS and Libraries to bring reproducible research practices into the norm.

Citation: Steeves, Vicky. “Reproducibility Librarianship.” Collaborative Librarianship 9, no. 2 (2017): 80-89. http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/vol9/iss2/4.

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Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity

Author: Kathryn M. Conrad

Abstract: Libraries have a long and distinguished history of publishing, since their earliest days. Traditionally libraries published to expose their collections through bibliographies, facsimiles, and catalogs. While the Internet has made discovery and dissemination of library holdings easier than ever before, digital publishing technologies have also unlocked compelling new purposes for library publishing, including through Open Access publishing initiatives. The self-publishing explosion and availability of self-publishing tools and services geared to libraries have heralded new opportunities for libraries, especially public libraries, to engage their communities in new ways. By supporting self-publishing initiative in their communities, public libraries can promote standards of quality in self-publishing, provide unique opportunities to engage underserved populations, and become true archives of their communities.

Citation: Conrad, K. M. (2017). Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity. Journal of Electronic Publishing, 20(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.106

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Source: Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity