Teaching with Data: Visualization and Information as a Critical Process

Authors: Andrew Battista, Jill Conte

Abstract: This chapter is published in the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook, Volume Two: Lesson Plans. It focuses on teaching with data, posing visualization and information as a critical process.

Citation: Battista, Andrew,and Jill A Conte 2017. “Teaching with Data: Visualization and Information as a Critical Process”. LIS Scholarship Archive. July 20. doi: 10.17605/OSF.IO/AMS2F

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto

Authors: Carolyn Moritz, Rachel Smart, Aaron Retteen, Matthew Hunter, Sarah Stanley, Devin Soper, Micah Vandegrift

Abstract: Digital scholarship is an evolving area of librarianship. In this piece we propose 10 theses, statements about what this kind of work DOES, rather than trying to define with it IS. We believe that digitally-inflected research and learning, and the characteristics they employ, are essential to the recentering of our profession’s position in/across the academy. We also believe that the “digital scholarship center” has served its time, and that the activities and models for digital scholarship work are core to librarianship. This manifesto is meant to serve as a starting point for a necessary discussion, not an end-all, be-all. We hope others will write and share counter-manifestos, passionate responses, or affirming statements.

Citation: Moritz, Carolyn, Rachel J Smart, Aaron Retteen, Matthew Hunter, Sarah Stanley, Devin Soper, and Micah Vandegrift 2017. “De-centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto”. LIS Scholarship Archive. August 7. DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/T7HFU.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future

Author: Martin Paul Eve

Abstract: If you work in a university, you are almost certain to have heard the term ‘open access’ in the past couple of years. You may also have heard either that it is the utopian answer to all the problems of research dissemination or perhaps that it marks the beginning of an apocalyptic new era of ‘pay-to-say’ publishing. In this book, Martin Paul Eve sets out the histories, contexts and controversies for open access, specifically in the humanities. Broaching practical elements alongside economic histories, open licensing, monographs and funder policies, this book is a must-read for both those new to ideas about open-access scholarly communications and those with an already keen interest in the latest developments for the humanities. This title is also available as Open Access via Cambridge Books Online.

Citation: Eve, Martin P., 2014. “Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies, and the Future”. Humanities Commons. DOI: 10.17613/M68W2B.

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Source: Humanities Commons

Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives

Authors: Cinthya Ippoliti, Amy Koshoffer, Renaine Julian, Micah Vandegrift, Devin Soper, Sophie Meridien

Abstract:  Research data services promise to advance many academic libraries’ strategic goals of becoming partners in the research process and integrating library services with modern research workflows. Academic librarians are well positioned to make an impact in this space due to their expertise in managing, curating, and preserving digital information, and a history of engaging with scholarly communications writ large. Some academic libraries have quickly developed infrastructure and support for every activity ranging from data storage and curation to project management and collaboration, while others are just beginning to think about addressing the data needs of their researchers. Regardless of which end of the spectrum they identify with, libraries are still seeking to understand the research landscape and define their role in the process. This article seeks to blend both a general perspective regarding these issues with actual case studies derived from three institutions, University of Cincinnati, Oklahoma State University, and Florida State University, all of which are at different levels of implementation, maturity, and campus involvement.

Citation: Ippoliti, C., Koshoffer, A. E., Julian, R., Vandegrift, M., Soper, D., & Meridien, S. (2018, January 12). Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives. Retrieved from 10.17605/OSF.IO/WZ8FN.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Reproducibility Librarianship

Author: Vicky Steeves

Abstract: Over the past few years, research reproducibility has been increasingly highlighted as a multifaceted challenge across many disciplines. There are socio-cultural obstacles as well as a constantly changing technical landscape that make replicating and reproducing research extremely difficult. Researchers face challenges in reproducing research across different operating systems and different versions of software, to name just a few of the many technical barriers. The prioritization of citation counts and journal prestige has undermined incentives to make research reproducible.

While libraries have been building support around research data management and digital scholarship, reproducibility is an emerging area that has yet to be systematically addressed. To respond to this, New York University (NYU) created the position of Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility (RDM & R), a dual appointment between the Center for Data Science (CDS) and the Division of Libraries. This report will outline the role of the RDM & R librarian, paying close attention to the collaboration between the CDS and Libraries to bring reproducible research practices into the norm.

Citation: Steeves, Vicky. “Reproducibility Librarianship.” Collaborative Librarianship 9, no. 2 (2017): 80-89. http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/vol9/iss2/4.

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Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity

Author: Kathryn M. Conrad

Abstract: Libraries have a long and distinguished history of publishing, since their earliest days. Traditionally libraries published to expose their collections through bibliographies, facsimiles, and catalogs. While the Internet has made discovery and dissemination of library holdings easier than ever before, digital publishing technologies have also unlocked compelling new purposes for library publishing, including through Open Access publishing initiatives. The self-publishing explosion and availability of self-publishing tools and services geared to libraries have heralded new opportunities for libraries, especially public libraries, to engage their communities in new ways. By supporting self-publishing initiative in their communities, public libraries can promote standards of quality in self-publishing, provide unique opportunities to engage underserved populations, and become true archives of their communities.

Citation: Conrad, K. M. (2017). Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity. Journal of Electronic Publishing, 20(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.106

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Source: Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity

Open access outreach: SMASH vs. Suasion

Author: Jill Cirasella

Abstract: Some librarians became open access (OA) supporters because they were outraged—and budgetarily hamstrung—by certain commercial publishers’ artificially inflated prices. (We know they are artificially inflated, unjustified production costs because these publishers have jaw-dropping profit margins, higher than those of Disney, Starbucks, Google, and even Apple.1) Other librarians were won over to OA by its more altruistic aspects, by the promise of a world rich in knowledge. However, in their outreach to patrons, librarians cannot rely on the arguments that swayed them. What convinced a librarian to embrace OA may not convert a student, a faculty member, or an administrator. Therefore, librarians must consider what rhetoric works on whom and craft different arguments for different audiences.

Citation:Cirasella, J. (2017). Open access outreach: SMASH vs. Suasion,  College & Research Libraries News 78(6). https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.78.6.323

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Source: Open access outreach: SMASH vs. Suasion

An Exploration of Faculty Experiences With Open Access Journal Publishing at Two Canadian Comprehensive Universities

Authors: Barbara McDonald, Ian Gibson, Elizabeth Yates, Carol Stephenson

Abstract: This exploratory study was intended to shed light on Canadian academics’ participation in, knowledge of and attitudes towards Open Access (OA) journal publishing. The primary aim of the study was to inform the authors’ schools’ educational and outreach efforts to faculty regarding OA publishing. The survey was conducted at two Canadian comprehensive universities: Brock University (St. Catharines, Ontario) and Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Ontario) in 2014. METHODS: A Web-based survey was distributed to faculty at each university. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Citation: McDonald, B., Gibson, I., Yates, E., & Stephenson, C. (2017). An Exploration of Faculty Experiences With Open Access Journal Publishing at Two Canadian Comprehensive Universities. Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 11(2). https://doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i2.3703

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Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals

Author: Melanie Schlosser

Abstract: Libraries have a mission to educate users about copyright, and library publishing staff are often involved in that work. This article investigates a concrete point of intersection between the two areas – copyright statements on library-published journals.  Journals published by members of the Library Publishing Coalition were examined for open access status, type and placement of copyright information, copyright ownership, and open licensing.  Journals in the sample were overwhelmingly (93%) open access. 80% presented copyright information of some kind, but only 30% of those included it at both the journal and the article level. Open licensing was present in 38% of the journals, and the most common ownership scenario was the author retaining copyright while granting a nonexclusive license to the journal or publisher. 9% of the sample journals included two or more conflicting rights statements. 76% of the journals did not consistently provide accurate, easily-accessible rights information, and numerous problems were found with the use of open licensing, including conflicting licenses, incomplete licenses, and licenses not appearing at the article level.

Citation: Schlosser, M. (2016). Write up! A Study of Copyright Information on Library-Published Journals. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, 4, eP2110. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2110

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Publication Services at the University Library Graz: A New Venture, a New Role

Authors: Clara Ginther, Karin Lackner, Christian Kaier

Abstract: Establishing Publication Services in the library at the University of Graz did more than broaden the service portfolio of the library. A convergence of expertise at the library, needs of researchers at the university, and ongoing changes in scholarly communication also contributed to the evolution of the library’s role and profile. The new services offer first-level support for matters pertaining to scholarly publishing and communications. Furthermore, Publication Services has developed into a knowledge sharing platform, extending beyond the library to other administrative departments and creating a community of practice.

Citation: Ginther, C., Lackner, K., & Kaier, C. (2017). Publication Services at the University Library Graz: A New Venture, a New Role. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2017.1324802

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Source: Publication Services at the University Library Graz: A New Venture, a New Role