The Impact of Gender on Citations: An Analysis of College & Research Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, and Library Quarterly

We’re preceding this post with a short PSA. Today’s International Women’s Strike offers a good opportunity for those of us interested in LIS research and scholarly communication to reflect upon the persistent gender gap in our own field, both in professional practice and in our knowledge production practices. Though we comprise the majority of the profession, women are still paid less than their male peers and assume leadership positions at lower rates. We are also take on unpaid “service” work at higher rates–work like what we do here at The Idealis. That’s why we, too, are striking today, having scheduled this post a few weeks back.

In solidarity,
Stacy, Lily & Nicky
The Idealis


Author: Malin Håkanson

Abstract: Three scholarly core journals of library and information science (LIS) were analyzed with respect to gender of article authors and gender of authors cited in these articles. The share of female contributors to these journals has certainly increased during the studied period, 1980–2000. However, the results of the quantitative citation analysis show puzzling differences concerning female and male authors’ citation practice. There may be a gender bias in LIS publishing, even though female authors have become more numerous. Further studies are needed to uncover the influence of other variables, such as subject content of the articles.

Håkanson, M. (2005). The Impact of Gender on Citations: An Analysis of College & Research Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, and Library Quarterly. College & Research Libraries, 66(4). doi:10.5860/crl.66.4.312

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