It’s all the same to me!: Copyright, contracts, and publisher self-archiving policies

Author: Nancy Sims

Abstract: “Green” open access—sharing copies of published scholarship online via repositories, rather than in the place of original publication—can be an appealing option for scholarly authors. It’s largely within their own control, and also often the option with least personal financial cost. Many publishers have standing policies enabling green open access of some kind, but the specifics of these policies vary widely and can be quite confusing for authors and others trying to understand and comply.

Citation: Sims, N. (2015). It’s all the same to me!: Copyright, contracts, and publisher self-archiving policies. College & Research Libraries News, 76(11), 578-581. https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.76.11.9411

View

arXiv e-prints and the journal of record: An analysis of roles and relationships

Authors: Vincent Larivière, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Benoit Macaluso, Staša Milojević, Blaise Cronin, and Mike Thelwall

Abstract: Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers — both published and unpublished — have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers.

Citation: Larivière, V., Sugimoto, C. R., Macaluso, B., Milojević, S., Cronin, B. and Thelwall, M. (2014), arXiv E-prints and the journal of record: An analysis of roles and relationships. J Assn Inf Sci Tec, 65: 1157–1169. doi:10.1002/asi.23044, arXiv:1306.3261

View

How to Scuttle a Scholarly Communication Initiative

Author: Dorothea Salo

Abstract: Since Clifford Lynch’s infamous call to arms (2003), academic libraries have been wasting their time trying to change the scholarly communication system on the feeblest of rationalizations. Proper librarians know that the current system is obviously the most sustainable, since it’s lasted this long and provided so much benefit to libraries (Rogers, 2012a) and profit to organizations as diverse as Elsevier, Nature Publishing Group, and the American Chemical Society, as well as their CEOs (Berrett, 2012). Moreover, faculty have proclaimed loudly and clearly that they believe libraries’ central role is to be the campus’s collective knowledge wallet (Schonfeld & Housewright, 2010; Lucky, 2012), so who are librarians to argue?

Citation: Salo, D., (2013). How to Scuttle a Scholarly Communication Initiative. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 1(4), p.eP1075. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1075

View

Adopting a Distributed Model for Data Services

Authors: Casey Gibbs, Marcos Hernandez, Pongracz Sennyey

Abstract: This article describes how the Saint Edward’s University Library implemented a distributed model for the Institutional Repository. Based on Cloud Based platforms and APIs, the Library has created an Institutional Repository that is scaleable and modular, considerably lowering its implementation and maintenance costs, while lowering its technical complexity.

Casey Gibbs, Marcos Hernandez, Pongracz Sennyey. (2017). Adopting a Distributed Model for Data Services. Code4Lib Journal. Issue 35.

View

Contribution of ROAR and OpenDOAR in Open Access Movement and Universal Access to Scholarly Information

Authors: Jayanti Chakravorty, Saumen Datta, Manoj Kumar Sinha

 

Abstract: Open Access initiative (OAI) is the wide discussed subject in the world of information and communication technology. The open access philosophy rapidly became popular and a number of universities and research institutions spontaneously came forward to provide open access to their scholarly communications, research outcomes and electronic journals. In the present paper, the meaning, definition and the present scenario of the Open Access initiative, as well as the problems and improvement of the Open Access initiative has been discussed. Contribution of ROAR and OpenDOAR in the field of Open Access initiative has been discussed in detail. The data collected from the secondary sources of information and presented in a tabular form for easy understanding of the LIS professionals and masses to know the importance of the Open Access initiative for giving access to scholarly communications for wider audience.

 

 

VIEW

 

The Post-Digital Publishing Archive: An Inventory of Speculative Strategies

Authors: Silvio Lorusso

 

Abstract: Recently launched, the Post-Digital Publishing Archive (P—DPA) is an online platform that allows users to systematically collect, organize, and keep track of art and design experiences at the intersection of publishing and digital technology. Filling a gap in the discussion, which is generally led by the narrative of innovation, P—DPA focuses on projects that investigate the social, cultural, and economic dynamics of publishing through a DIY approach, custom tools, and the counterintuitive employment of popular platforms. Like every archive, P—DPA embodies a specific attitude that is mainly expressed by the criteria employed to select the works and by the multiple relations among them. How can the materiality of such works be properly defined through a categorization system? What technological, processual, and signifying aspects need to be taken into account? By acting as an inventory of speculative strategies, P—DPA aims to become a reference point for designers and artists interested in publishing and indirectly extend its very notion.

 

Citation: Lorusso, S, (2016) The Post-Digital Publishing Archive: An Inventory of Speculative StrategiesThe Journal of Electronic Publishing. Volume 19, Issue 2: Disrupting the Humanities: Towards Posthumanities http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0019.209

 

VIEW