Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing

Author: Roger C. Schonfeld

Abstract: In this piece, I propose that the academic library engage more robustly to take back control of its collections budget. I do not evaluate, and certainly do not critique, existing negotiating models. Fundamentally, I propose that libraries find ways to act with single purpose to strengthen their negotiating position. This proposal has not been “road-tested” at any institution of which I am aware. As written, it is organized around what a library might do, but readers may also find opportunities for groups of libraries to engage with some of these approaches through consortia and systems. It is my hope to contribute to ongoing conversations about how best to strengthen the library’s negotiating hand.

Citation: Schonfeld, Roger C. “Red Light, Green Light: Aligning the Library to Support Licensing.” Ithaka S+R. Aug. 17, 2017. https://doi.org/10.18665/sr.304419.

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Changing the Culture in Scholarly Communications

Author: Alice Meadows

Abstract: I was delighted to see that the theme for this year’s FORCE2017 meeting is Changing the Culture – a great opportunity to engage with colleagues from across the scholarly communications community on key questions such as: What needs to change in our culture and why? Who are our stakeholders and how are we going to involve them? What are the most effective ways to change the culture; which approach works best – carrot, stick, or both? How will we measure success?

Citation: Meadows, Alice. “Changing the Culture in Scholarly Communications.” The Scholarly Kitchen. Blog post. August 7, 2017.

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It’s all the same to me!: Copyright, contracts, and publisher self-archiving policies

Author: Nancy Sims

Abstract: “Green” open access—sharing copies of published scholarship online via repositories, rather than in the place of original publication—can be an appealing option for scholarly authors. It’s largely within their own control, and also often the option with least personal financial cost. Many publishers have standing policies enabling green open access of some kind, but the specifics of these policies vary widely and can be quite confusing for authors and others trying to understand and comply.

Citation: Sims, N. (2015). It’s all the same to me!: Copyright, contracts, and publisher self-archiving policies. College & Research Libraries News, 76(11), 578-581. https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.76.11.9411

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New World, Same Model: Periodicals Price Survey 2017

Authors: Stephen Bosch and Kittie Henderson

Abstract: The shifts to online and OA continue apace, but neither is causing a sea change in pricing. The shift to digital delivery of serials content has had a profound effect on the information ecosystem. Powerful discovery and social networking tools expose users to an incredibly rich world of commercially produced and open access (OA) content. Most publishers have explored new ways of pricing their content—such as population served, FTE (full-time equivalent), tiered pricing based upon Carnegie classification, or other defining criteria—or the database model, which treats all content within an e-journal package as a database, eliminating the need for title by title reconciliation. However, in the end, the pricing conversation always seems to circle back to the revenue generated by the annual subscription model.

Citation: Bosch S and Henderson K. (2017). New World, Same Model: Periodicals Price Survey 2017. Library Journal. Retrieved from http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2017/04/publishing/new-world-same-model-periodicals-price-survey-2017/#_

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Fresh Perspectives on the Future of University-Based Publishing

Author: Amy Brand

Abstract: Academic libraries are taking on more active roles in support of research dissemination. Does a diminished role for university presses necessarily follow? It does not. I’ll discuss the distinctive and increasingly urgent functions of the university press, and the challenge of balancing the imperatives of sustainability and openness. How do we meet the differing requirements of professional, text, and trade authors? How do we fulfill our mission to make our publications available, discoverable, and searchable in digital form now, and in perpetuity? I will also cover strategies to promote productive partnerships, and the significant benefits of closer coordination among presses, libraries, and the academic departments within their institutions.

Citation: Amy Brand. 2017. Fresh Perspectives on the Future of University-Based Publishing. CNI Spring 2017 Membership Meeting, Closing Plenary. Retrieved from https://www.cni.org/events/membership-meetings/past-meetings/spring-2017/plenary-sessions-s17

Fresh Perspectives on the Future of University-Based Publishing from CNI Video Channel on Vimeo.

Research output availability on academic social networks: implications for stakeholders in academic publishing

Authors: Mikael Laakso, Juho Lindman, Cenyu Shen, Linus Nyman, and Bo-Christer Björk

Abstract: A recent disruption in academic publishing are Academic Social Networks (ASN), i.e. web platforms such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu that have provided new ways for researchers to disseminate, search for, and retrieve research articles. ASNs are still a grey area in terms of implications for involved stakeholders, and research on them has so far been scarce. In an effort to map out factors related to ASN use this article provides a multi-method case study of one business school (Hanken School of Economics, Finland) that incorporates 1) a bibliometric analysis on the full-text availability of research output on ASNs for research published 2012–2014 by Hanken affiliated authors, 2) semi-structured interviews with faculty active in publishing in order to gain insight into motivations for use and use patterns, and 3) a survey distributed to all research-active faculty and doctoral students in order to gain a wider perspective on ASN use. ASNs have for many become the primary way to provide access to one’s research output, outpacing all other types of online locations such as personal websites and repositories. Based on the case study findings, earlier research, and recent industry developments, the article concludes with a discussion about the implications that the current trajectory of ASN use has on major stakeholders in academic publishing.

Citation: Laakso, M., Lindman, J., Shen, C., Nyman, L., & Björk, B-C. (2017). Research output availability on academic social networks: Implications for stakeholders in academic publishing. Electronic Markets, 27(2), 125-133. doi:10.1007/s12525-016-0242-1

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Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science?

Author: Stephen Buranyi

Abstract: It is an industry like no other, with profit margins to rival Google – and it was created by one of Britain’s most notorious tycoons: Robert Maxwell.

Citation: Buranyi, S. (2017, June 27). Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science? The Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/profitable-business-scientific-publishing-bad-for-science 

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Digital scholarship as a learning center in the library: Building relationships and educational initiatives

Authors: Merinda Kaye Hensley, Steven J. Bell

Abstract:  While librarians may have loads of ideas for how to design digital scholarship support and services, if those ideas clash with a scholars’ workflow or goals for tenure and promotion, we failed. The question remains: How do we align our ideas and expertise to the digital scholarship needs of students and faculty? We argue the answer is centered on two alternative needs assessment approaches: relationship building and educational initiatives.

Citation: Hensley, M., & Bell, S. (2017). Digital scholarship as a learning center in the library: Building relationships and educational initiatives. College & Research Libraries News, 78(3), 155-158. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/crln.78.3.9638

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Miles to go for Scholarly Commons to become a global academic norm

Author: Ravi Murugesan

Abstract: In part one of this series, INASP Associate Ravi Murugesan reflected on the development of a Scholarly Commons and the need to consider how the guiding principles can involve, and be relevant to, researchers in the Global South.

Citation: Murugesan, Ravi. “Miles to Go for Scholarly Commons to Become a Global Academic Norm.” Practising Development [blog] (April 12, 2017).

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Source: Miles to go for Scholarly Commons to become a global academic norm | Practising Development