Contribution of ROAR and OpenDOAR in Open Access Movement and Universal Access to Scholarly Information

Authors: Jayanti Chakravorty, Saumen Datta, Manoj Kumar Sinha

 

Abstract: Open Access initiative (OAI) is the wide discussed subject in the world of information and communication technology. The open access philosophy rapidly became popular and a number of universities and research institutions spontaneously came forward to provide open access to their scholarly communications, research outcomes and electronic journals. In the present paper, the meaning, definition and the present scenario of the Open Access initiative, as well as the problems and improvement of the Open Access initiative has been discussed. Contribution of ROAR and OpenDOAR in the field of Open Access initiative has been discussed in detail. The data collected from the secondary sources of information and presented in a tabular form for easy understanding of the LIS professionals and masses to know the importance of the Open Access initiative for giving access to scholarly communications for wider audience.

 

 

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Research Data Services in Academic Libraries: Data Intensive Roles for the Future?

Authors: Carol Tenopir, Dane Hughes, Suzie Allard, Mike Frame, Ben Birch, Lynn Baird, Robert Sandusky, Madison Langseth, and Andrew Lundeen

 

Abstract: Objectives: The primary objectives of this study are to gauge the various levels of Research Data Service academic libraries provide based on demographic factors, gauging RDS growth since 2011, and what obstacles may prevent expansion or growth of services.Methods: Survey of academic institutions through stratified random sample of ACRL library directors across the U.S. and Canada. Frequencies and chi-square analysis were applied, with some responses grouped into broader categories for analysis.

Results: Minimal to no change for what services were offered between survey years, and interviews with library directors were conducted to help explain this lack of change.

Conclusion: Further analysis is forthcoming for a librarians study to help explain possible discrepancies in organizational objectives and librarian sentiments of RDS.

 

Citation: Tenopir, C, Hughes, D, Allard, S, Frame, M, Birch, B, Baird, L., Sandusky, R, Langseth, M, & Lundeen, A (2015) Research Data Services in Academic Libraries: Data Intensive Roles for the FutureJournal of eScience Librarianship 4(2): e1085. http://dx.doi.org/10.7191/jeslib.2015.1085

 

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Data Curation and the Arts: How Do Musicians Curate Their Data?

Authors: Amy S. Jackson, Jonathan Wheeler, Todd Quinn

 

Abstract: Professional musicians were surveyed to determine how personal, amateur recordings of performances are shared with students and colleagues. Sharing files on social media is common, with Facebook, YouTube, and Vimeo used most frequently. Although these are popular social media platforms, they do not have enhanced format support and robust metadata. Additionally, licensing terms for each platform differ, and may be not in the best interest of the musician. Although recordings are not traditionally considered data, data curation principles can be applied to these types of files, and the library is positioned to become an active participant in this process.

 

Citation: Jackson, A. S., Wheeler, J., & Quinn, T. (2016). Data Curation and the Arts: How Do Musicians Curate Their Data? Music Reference Services Quarterly, 19(3–4), 191–207. http://digitalrepository.unm.edu/ulls_fsp/115/

 

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