Reproducibility Librarianship

Author: Vicky Steeves

Abstract: Over the past few years, research reproducibility has been increasingly highlighted as a multifaceted challenge across many disciplines. There are socio-cultural obstacles as well as a constantly changing technical landscape that make replicating and reproducing research extremely difficult. Researchers face challenges in reproducing research across different operating systems and different versions of software, to name just a few of the many technical barriers. The prioritization of citation counts and journal prestige has undermined incentives to make research reproducible.

While libraries have been building support around research data management and digital scholarship, reproducibility is an emerging area that has yet to be systematically addressed. To respond to this, New York University (NYU) created the position of Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility (RDM & R), a dual appointment between the Center for Data Science (CDS) and the Division of Libraries. This report will outline the role of the RDM & R librarian, paying close attention to the collaboration between the CDS and Libraries to bring reproducible research practices into the norm.

Citation: Steeves, Vicky. “Reproducibility Librarianship.” Collaborative Librarianship 9, no. 2 (2017): 80-89. http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/vol9/iss2/4.

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Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity

Author: Kathryn M. Conrad

Abstract: Libraries have a long and distinguished history of publishing, since their earliest days. Traditionally libraries published to expose their collections through bibliographies, facsimiles, and catalogs. While the Internet has made discovery and dissemination of library holdings easier than ever before, digital publishing technologies have also unlocked compelling new purposes for library publishing, including through Open Access publishing initiatives. The self-publishing explosion and availability of self-publishing tools and services geared to libraries have heralded new opportunities for libraries, especially public libraries, to engage their communities in new ways. By supporting self-publishing initiative in their communities, public libraries can promote standards of quality in self-publishing, provide unique opportunities to engage underserved populations, and become true archives of their communities.

Citation: Conrad, K. M. (2017). Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity. Journal of Electronic Publishing, 20(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.106

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Source: Public Libraries as Publishers: Critical Opportunity

An Exploration of Faculty Experiences With Open Access Journal Publishing at Two Canadian Comprehensive Universities

Authors: Barbara McDonald, Ian Gibson, Elizabeth Yates, Carol Stephenson

Abstract: This exploratory study was intended to shed light on Canadian academics’ participation in, knowledge of and attitudes towards Open Access (OA) journal publishing. The primary aim of the study was to inform the authors’ schools’ educational and outreach efforts to faculty regarding OA publishing. The survey was conducted at two Canadian comprehensive universities: Brock University (St. Catharines, Ontario) and Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Ontario) in 2014. METHODS: A Web-based survey was distributed to faculty at each university. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Citation: McDonald, B., Gibson, I., Yates, E., & Stephenson, C. (2017). An Exploration of Faculty Experiences With Open Access Journal Publishing at Two Canadian Comprehensive Universities. Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 11(2). https://doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i2.3703

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