Funding community controlled open infrastructure for scholarly communication: The 2.5% commitment initiative

Authors: David W. Lewis, Lori Goetsch, Diane Graves, Mike Roy

Abstract: In August 2017, a short paper, “The 2.5% Commitment,” was distributed on several email lists.1 The paper proposed that every academic library should commit to invest 2.5% of its total budget to support the common infrastructure needed to create the open scholarly commons. Somewhat to our surprise, the paper and the ideas it contained have generated widespread discussions and interest.

Citation: Lewis, D., Goetsch, L., Graves, D., & Roy, M. (2018). Funding community controlled open infrastructure for scholarly communication: The 2.5% commitment initiative. College & Research Libraries News, 79(3), 133.


Community Aligned Service Providers – ALA Midwinter 2018 ACRL/SPARC Forum

Author: Chealsye Bowley

Abstract: Panel presentation on community aligned service providers for the ACRL/SPARC Forum session at ALA Midwinter 2018. Session description: “Shaping the Landscape of Open Access Publishing: Individually, Locally, Collectively.” With the acquisition and creation of scholarly communication platforms/infrastructure by major commercial entities, the balance of influence continues to shift. This forum will bring together library stakeholders for a conversation about how the library community can reassert its influence to shape the open access publishing landscape. This session is designed to reach a broad range of librarians and other information professionals. Panelists will focus on: 1) individual action: ‘what can one person do?’; 2) local coordinated action: ‘how can one group or institution effect change?’; and, 3) collective action: ‘how can libraries work together to provide sustainable alternatives?’

Citation:Community Aligned Service Providers – ALA Midwinter 2018 ACRL/SPARC Forum Bowley, C. (2018, February 10). . Retrieved from


From Wikidata to Scholia: creating structured linked data to generate scholarly profiles

Authors: Mairelys Lemus-Rojas, good

Abstract: Wikidata, the newest project of the Wikimedia Foundation, has been increasingly attracting contributors from all over the world. Wikidata is a free knowledge base that stores multilingual structured linked data. At the IUPUI University Library, we are working on a project where our goal is to provide a presence in Wikidata for our faculty members. As we will demonstrate, adding data about our faculty will enable us to generate scholarly profiles for them. For the pilot project, we selected 18 faculty members from the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. The School of Philanthropy, located in the IUPUI campus, is the first school dedicated solely to philanthropy education and research. The school and its faculty also provide many widely used works of scholarship. We approached this project by using Wikidata as the repository for all the data associated with the faculty members. We created entries (namely Items in Wikidata) for the selected group of faculty, their co-authors, and all their published articles with DOIs. To create entries for the articles, we used a tool that allows users to enter either a DOI, PMID or PMCID and generates the Items directly in Wikidata. We then used Scholia, an open source application, to generate the scholarly profiles. Scholia queries Wikidata and presents the user with aggregated and graphically-displayed information. It also enables us, for example, to learn more about our faculty members’ collaborators and scholarly interests. In addition to demonstrating our methods for contributing content to a structured linked data knowledge base, this presentation will share the potential benefits and challenges for libraries to consider. Libraries have both the expertise and data sources to take a leading role in contributing to and promoting open knowledge projects for their communities.

Citation: Lemus-Rojas, M., & Odell, J. (2018, February 16). From Wikidata to Scholia: creating structured linked data to generate scholarly profiles.


Archidora: Integrating Archivematica and Islandora

Author: Tim Hutchinson

Abstract: “Archidora” is shorthand for the publicly available integration between the open source software packages Archivematica and Islandora. Sponsored by the University of Saskatchewan Library, this integration enables the automated ingest into Archivematica of objects created in Islandora. This will allow institutions that use Islandora as a digital asset management system, particularly for digitized material, to take advantage of Archivematica’s standards-based digital preservation functionality, without requiring staff doing digitization to interact with Archivematica. This paper outlines the basic functionality and workflow of archidora; provides an overview of the development process including challenges and lessons learned; and discusses related initiatives and possible future directions for development.

Citation: Hutchison, T. (2018). “Archidora: Integrating Archivematica and Islandora.” Code4Lib Journal, 39. Feb 5, 2018.

Source: Code4Lib Journal

Librarians’ Perspectives on the Factors Influencing Research Data Management Programs

Authors: Ixchel M. Faniel, Lynn Silipigni Connaway

Abstract: This qualitative research study examines librarians’ research data management (RDM) experiences, specifically the factors that influence their ability to support researchers’ needs. Findings from interviews with 36 academic library professionals in the United States identify 5 factors of influence: 1) technical resources; 2) human resources; 3) researchers’ perceptions about the library; 4) leadership support; and 5) communication, coordination, and collaboration. Findings show different aspects of these factors facilitate or constrain RDM activity. The implications of these factors on librarians’ continued work in RDM are considered.

Citation: Faniel, I., & Connaway, L. (2018). “Librarians’ Perspectives on the Factors Influencing Research Data Management Programs.” College & Research Libraries, 79(1), 100. doi:

Source: College & Research Libraries

Drawing the line: Why we publish where we publish

Author: Eamon Tewell

Introduction: A colleague of mine was recently wondering which journal she should submit her article to. There were a few possibilities, and she knew wanted to publish in an open access journal. My colleague is near the end of her tenure clock and she wants to contribute her hard work to open access journals instead of publishers making obscene profits off of scholars’ free labor—labor which encompasses creating scholarship, reviewing it, and editing it. My colleague’s email made me wonder: where is the line we draw for our participation in a scholarly communication system that is predicated on, and profits immensely from, the unpaid work of researchers? That line will be different for everyone, and it is worth considering for all librarian-researchers.

Citation: Tewell, E. (2018). “Drawing the line: Why we publish where we publish.” The Librarian Parlor.

Source: The Librarian Parlor

Spotlight on Digital Government Information Preservation: Examining the Context, Outcomes, Limitations, and Successes of the DataRefuge Movement

Author: Eric Johnson and Alicia Kubas

Abstract: Access and preservation of online government data and information has been a long-standing and complex issue for librarians in government information librarianship, but it has recently started to receive attention on a larger level from the media, public, and libraries in general. The most recent initiative to archive digital government data was the DataRefuge movement in 2016 and 2017, which sponsored DataRescue events where people came together to capture static webpages and harvest dynamic online content for preservation purposes. This article examines the history and context of print and digital government information preservation initiatives and then focuses in on the DataRefuge movement to discuss its outcomes, limitations, and successes in light of long-term preservation and public access.

Citation: Johnson, E. and Kubas, A (2018). “Spotlight on Digital Government Information Preservation: Examining the Context, Outcomes, Limitations, and Successes of the DataRefuge Movement”. In The Library With The Lead Pipe.


Source: In the Library With The Lead Pipe

Predatory publishing from a global south perspective

Author: Reggie Raju

Abstract: The unilateral determination of a definition of predatory publishing, by Jeffrey Beall, has sent the research publishing world into a tizz. Even though Beall has withdrawn his list, unfortunately in the current technological age this list is not cleared from the web archive nor is there a prevention of the rehashing of the list by someone else. Nor, has there been subsequently an adequate reconceptualization of predatory publishing to ensure that it is not discriminatory to open access or the global south.

Writing as a Fellow of the LPC from the global south, I feel a sense of obligation to follow the call that African academics and intellectuals (not that I am either), on the continent and in the diaspora, play a role in countering the prejudice and misinformation about Africa. Be that as it may, I think there are significant lessons for both the global south and north by interrogating the concept of predatory publishing. The recently published article by Olivarez and others (2018) highlight the need for interventions to remedy the insensitive generalization of predatory publishing.

Citation: Raju, Reggie (2018). ““Predatory publishing from a global south perspective.” Fellows Journal, LPC Blog.



Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives

Authors: Cinthya Ippoliti, Amy Koshoffer, Renaine Julian, Micah Vandegrift, Devin Soper, Sophie Meridien

Abstract:  Research data services promise to advance many academic libraries’ strategic goals of becoming partners in the research process and integrating library services with modern research workflows. Academic librarians are well positioned to make an impact in this space due to their expertise in managing, curating, and preserving digital information, and a history of engaging with scholarly communications writ large. Some academic libraries have quickly developed infrastructure and support for every activity ranging from data storage and curation to project management and collaboration, while others are just beginning to think about addressing the data needs of their researchers. Regardless of which end of the spectrum they identify with, libraries are still seeking to understand the research landscape and define their role in the process. This article seeks to blend both a general perspective regarding these issues with actual case studies derived from three institutions, University of Cincinnati, Oklahoma State University, and Florida State University, all of which are at different levels of implementation, maturity, and campus involvement.

Citation: Ippoliti, C., Koshoffer, A. E., Julian, R., Vandegrift, M., Soper, D., & Meridien, S. (2018, January 12). Scaling Research Data Management Services Along the Maturity Spectrum: Three Institutional Perspectives. Retrieved from 10.17605/OSF.IO/WZ8FN.


Source: LIS Scholarship Archive

Harvesting the Academic Landscape: Streamlining the Ingestion of Professional Scholarship Metadata into the Institutional Repository

Author: Jonathan Bull and Teresa Auch Schultz

Abstract: INTRODUCTION Although librarians initially hoped institutional repositories (IRs) would grow through researcher self-archiving, practice shows that growth is much more likely through library-directed deposit. Libraries must then find efficient ways to ingest material into their IR to ensure growth and relevance. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM Valparaiso University developed and implemented a workflow that was semiautomated to help cut down on the time needed to ingest articles into its IR, ValpoScholar. The workflow, which continues to be refined, makes use of practices and ideas used by other repositories to more efficiently collect metadata for items and upload them to the repository. NEXT STEPS The article discusses the pros and cons of this workflow and areas of ingesting that still need to be addressed, including adding full-text items, checking copyright policies, managing student staffing, and dealing with hurdles created by the repository’s software.

Source: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Citation: Bull, J. & Schultz, T.A., (2018). “Harvesting the Academic Landscape: Streamlining the Ingestion of Professional Scholarship Metadata into the Institutional Repository.” Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 6(1). DOI: