Teaching Our Faculty: Developing Copyright and Scholarly Communication Outreach Programs

Authors: Jennifer Duncan, Susanne Clement, Betsy Rozum

Abstract: Although faculty are prolific producers and users of copyrighted works, they are often more concerned with ensuring that their articles are published than the terms of publication and how they can use the articles in their future teaching and research. However, once we started a conversation with faculty members about some of these issues, we discovered they were very interested in having the university provide them with the resources to establish a broad overview of the unforeseen ways copyright might be affecting their teaching and research. Unfortunately, many universities, have no copyright attorney on staff or unit devoted to copyright issues; this was certainly the case at USU. What is the role of the librarian in helping faculty when they clearly need, and even want, to understand copyright, but the university has not made available the appropriate resources?

Citation: Duncan, Jennifer; Clement, Susanne; and Rozum, Betty, “Teaching Our Faculty: Developing Copyright and Scholarly Communication Outreach Programs” (2013). Library Faculty & Staff Publications. Paper 117. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/lib_pubs/117

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Source: Teaching Our Faculty: Developing Copyright and Scholarly Communication Outreach Programs

Live Discussion on Open Access — Cultural Anthropology

Author: Grant Jun Otsuki

Abstract: These are the questions and comments from the March 20th, 2013, discussion on Open Access with SCA President Brad Weiss, and CA Editor Charles Piot.

Citation: Otsuki, Grant Jun. “Read the Transcript of our March 20th Live Discussion on Open Access.” SCA News, Cultural Anthropology website, March 21, 2013. https://culanth.org/fieldsights/151-read-the-transcript-of-our-march-20th-live-discussion-on-open-access

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Source: Live Discussion on Open Access — Cultural Anthropology

The Digital Archiving of Endangered Language Oral Traditions: Kaipuleohone at the University of Hawai‘i and C’ek’aedi Hwnax in Alaska

Author: Andrea L. Berez

Abstract: This essay compares and contrasts two small-scale digital endangered language archives with regard to their relevance for oral tradition research. The first is a university-based archive curated at the University of Hawai‘i, which is designed to house endangered language materials arising from the fieldwork of university researchers. The second is an indigenously-administered archive in rural Alaska that serves the language maintenance needs of the Ahtna Athabaskan Alaska Native community.

Citation: Berez, Andrea L. “The Digital Archiving of Endangered Language Oral Traditions: Kaipuleohone at the University of Hawai’i and C’ek’aedi Hwnax in Alaska.” Oral Tradition 28.2 (2013).

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How to Scuttle a Scholarly Communication Initiative

Author: Dorothea Salo

Abstract: Since Clifford Lynch’s infamous call to arms (2003), academic libraries have been wasting their time trying to change the scholarly communication system on the feeblest of rationalizations. Proper librarians know that the current system is obviously the most sustainable, since it’s lasted this long and provided so much benefit to libraries (Rogers, 2012a) and profit to organizations as diverse as Elsevier, Nature Publishing Group, and the American Chemical Society, as well as their CEOs (Berrett, 2012). Moreover, faculty have proclaimed loudly and clearly that they believe libraries’ central role is to be the campus’s collective knowledge wallet (Schonfeld & Housewright, 2010; Lucky, 2012), so who are librarians to argue?

Citation: Salo, D., (2013). How to Scuttle a Scholarly Communication Initiative. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 1(4), p.eP1075. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1075

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Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

Authors: Ellen Collins, Caren Milloy, and Graham Stone

Abstract: This guide explores concerns expressed in public evidence given by researchers, learned societies and publishers to inquiries in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and also concerns expressed by researchers working with the OAPEN-UK project. We have also identified a number of common questions and have drafted answers, which have been checked by experts including Creative Commons. The guide has been edited by active researchers, to make sure that it is relevant and useful to academics faced with making decisions about publishing. It is available under a CC BY license.

Citation: Ellen Collins, Caren Milloy, and Graham Stone. “Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors.” JISC Collections.

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Source: Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

What do Italian Researchers think about Open Research Data?

Authors: Fava, I & Gargiulo, P

Abstract: From August to December 2012, the OpenAIRE Italian National Open Access Desk conducted a survey to find out what researchers and all the people involved with research in universities and research centres were doing with reference to research data archiving, management and access policies. The aim was to produce an overview of the state of the art of research data production, management and sharing in Italy, and to investigate researchers opinions and attitudes towards a potential National infrastructure for data storage, curation and preservation. The survey addressed more than 1240 directors of research departments in universities and research institutions, who where then requested to disseminate the survey among their researchers.

Fava, I & Gargiulo, P. (2013). What do Italian Researchers think about Open Research Data? [Report]

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