Coherence of “Open” Initiatives in Higher Education and Research: Framing a Policy Agenda

Author(s): Corrall, Sheila; Pinfield, Stephen.

Abstract: “Open” approaches have the potential to advance significantly the mission of higher education and research institutions worldwide, but the multiplicity of initiatives raises questions about their coherence and points to the need for a more coordinated approach to policy development. Drawing on the European e-InfraNet project, we adopt a broad definition of Open, including activity alongside content, and identify the different Open domains, their salient characteristics and relationships. We propose a high-level typology and model of Open to inform policy design and delivery, and employ Willinsky’s framework for open source and open access to discuss the theoretical underpinnings of openness, finding important commonalities among the domains, which suggests that the framework can extend to all the Open areas. We then examine potential shared benefits of Open approaches, which reinforce the argument for a unified policy agenda. We conclude with some observations on limits of openness, and implications for policy.

Citation: Corrall, S., & Pinfield, S. (2014). Coherence of “Open” Initiatives in Higher Education and Research: Framing a Policy Agenda. In iConference 2014 Proceedings (p. 293 – 313). doi:10.9776/14085

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Source: iConference 2014 Proceedings

Public Libraries and Knowledge Politics

Author: Stuart Lawson

Abstract: [Preprint of a forthcoming book chapter] To complement contemporary discussions on open access, this chapter considers public libraries as one element of the longer history of access to scholarly knowledge. A historical perspective reveals that access to knowledge has undergone a long, slow process of change, related to social, technical, and political developments in printing, mass literacy, universities, and libraries. Until the advent of the digital technologies which enable the open access movement, public access to the scholarly record required physical access to printed works. Public libraries helped facilitate this, fulfilling a vital role in extending access to scholarship beyond the academy. Yet the complex power dynamics at play in the dissemination of ideas are visible in the creation of public libraries, through the role of philanthropy, Enlightenment notions of self-improvement, and the class politics of the Victorian era. Examining these origins reveals that current debates around the consequences of widening public access to scholarship – and how this expansion should be paid for – are nothing new. The liberal ideals underpinning librarianship in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are still present in the digital era, and exploring the biases and contradictions contained within public libraries’ history may give us pause when considering the political context of scholarly publishing today.

Citation: Lawson, S. (2018). Public Libraries and Knowledge Politics [Preprint]. Retrieved March 20, 2018, from http://eprints.rclis.org/32361/

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Source: Public Libraries and Knowledge Politics

The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator

Authors: Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov

Abstract: There remains something of a disconnect between how research librarians themselves see their role and its responsibilities and how these are viewed by their faculty colleagues. Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov imagine how the research librarian of the future might work, utilising new data science and digital skills to drive more collaborative and open scholarship. Arguably this future is already upon us but institutions must implement a structured approach to developing librarians’ skills and services to fully realise the benefits.

Citation: Jeannette Ekstrøm, Mikael Elbaek, Chris Erdmann and Ivo Grigorov. (2016). The research librarian of the future: data scientist and co-investigator. London School of Economics Impact of Social Sciences Blog.

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Strategies and guidelines for scholarly publishing of biodiversity data

Authors: Lyubomir Penev, Daniel Mietchen, Vishwas Shravan Chavan, Gregor Hagedorn, Vincent Stuart Smith, David Shotton, Éamonn Ó Tuama, Viktor Senderov, Teodor Georgiev, Pavel Stoev, Quentin John Groom, David Remsen, Scott C. Edmunds

Abstract: The present paper describes policies and guidelines for scholarly publishing of biodiversity and biodiversity-related data, elaborated and updated during the Framework Program 7 EU BON project, on the basis of an earlier version published on Pensoft’s website in 2011. The document discusses some general concepts, including a definition of datasets, incentives to publish data and licenses for data publishing. Further, it defines and compares several routes for data publishing, namely as (1) supplementary files to research articles, which may be made available directly by the publisher, or (2) published in a specialized open data repository with a link to it from the research article, or (3) as a data paper, i.e., a specific, stand-alone publication describing a particular dataset or a collection of datasets, or (4) integrated narrative and data publishing through online import/download of data into/from manuscripts, as provided by the Biodiversity Data Journal.

The paper also contains detailed instructions on how to prepare and peer review data intended for publication, listed under the Guidelines for Authors and Reviewers, respectively. Special attention is given to existing standards, protocols and tools to facilitate data publishing, such as the Integrated Publishing Toolkit of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF IPT) and the DarwinCore Archive (DwC-A).

A separate section describes most leading data hosting/indexing infrastructures and repositories for biodiversity and ecological data.

Citation: Penev L, Mietchen D, Chavan V, Hagedorn G, Smith V, Shotton D, Ó Tuama É, Senderov V, Georgiev T, Stoev P, Groom Q, Remsen D, Edmunds S (2017) Strategies and guidelines for scholarly publishing of biodiversity data. Research Ideas and Outcomes 3: e12431.https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.3.e12431

 

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East African Social Sciences and Humanities Publishing: A Handmade Bibliometrics Approach

Author: Nora Schmidt

Abstract: For Eastern Africa, very little information about the SSH knowledge production can be found from a European perspective. Adequate indicators like information-rich bibliographic databases that cover journals and book publishers based in East Africa are lacking. This research in progress explores their indexing situation in detail, their development, which is closely connected to political history, their (non-)usage, and affiliations as well as career-stages of their authors. Furthermore, it also pays attention to SSH researchers based in East Africa who use other publication venues. Any bibliometric analysis in this field needs to rely on manual data collection, otherwise it would be heavily biased. This study lays out the foundation for citation analyses, qualitative research on the publications’ content and the self-description of East African scholars against the background of an academic environment that is often described as “international”.

Citation: Schmidt, Nora. (2016, October). East African Social Sciences and Humanities Publishing: A Handmade Bibliometrics Approach. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.162217

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A Data Citation Roadmap for Scientific Publishers

Authors: Helena Cousijn, Amye Kenall, Emma Ganley, Melissa Harrison, David Kernohan, Fiona Murphy, Patrick Polischuk, Maryann Martone, Timothy Clark

Abstract: This article presents a practical roadmap for scholarly publishers to implement data citation in accordance with the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (JDDCP), a synopsis and harmonization of the recommendations of major science policy bodies. It was developed by the Publishers Early Adopters Expert Group as part of the Data Citation Implementation Pilot (DCIP) project, an initiative of FORCE11.org and the NIH BioCADDIE program. The structure of the roadmap presented here follows the ‘life of a paper’ workflow and includes the categories Pre-submission, Submission, Production, and Publication. The roadmap is intended to be publisher-agnostic so that all publishers can use this as a starting point when implementing JDDCP-compliant data citation.

Citation: Helena Cousijn, Amye Kenall, Emma Ganley, Melissa Harrison, David Kernohan, Fiona Murphy, Patrick Polischuk, Maryann Martone, Timothy Clark. (2017). A Data Citation Roadmap for Scientific Publishers. bioRxiv 100784; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/100784

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