The Johns Hopkins Libraries open access promotion fund: An open and shut case study

Author(s): Robin N. Sinn, Sue M. Woodson, and Mark Cyzyk

Abstract: This article details the history and outcomes of the open access promotion fund at Johns Hopkins University. It concludes with lessons learned from the experience of opening and closing the fund.

Citation: Sinn, Robin N., Sue M. Woodson, and Mark Cyzyk. “The Johns Hopkins Libraries open access promotion fund An open and shut case study.” College & Research Libraries News 78.1 (2017): 32-35.

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Source: The Johns Hopkins Libraries open access promotion fund: An open and shut case study

A Brief History of Archiving in Language Documentation, with an Annotated Bibliography

Authors: Ryan Henke and Andrea L. Berez-Kroeker

Abstract: We survey the history of practices, theories, and trends in archiving for the purposes of language documentation and endangered language conservation. We identify four major periods in the history of such archiving. First, a period from before the time of Boas and Sapir until the early 1990s, in which analog materials were collected and deposited into physical repositories that were not easily accessible to many researchers or speaker communities. A second period began in the 1990s, when increased attention to language endangerment and the development of modern documentary linguistics engendered a renewed and redefined focus on archiving and an embrace of digital technology. A third period took shape in the early twenty-first century, where technological advancements and efforts to develop standards of practice met with important critiques. Finally, in the current period, conversations have arisen toward participatory models for archiving, which break traditional boundaries to expand the audiences and uses for archives while involving speaker communities directly in the archival process. Following the article, we provide an annotated bibliography of 85 publications from the literature surrounding archiving in documentary linguistics. This bibliography contains cornerstone contributions to theory and practice, and it also includes pieces that embody conversations representative of particular historical periods.

Citation: Henke, Ryan and Andrea L. Berez-Kroeker. 2016. A Brief History of Archiving in Language Documentation, with an Annotated Bibliography. Language Documentation & Conservation 10. 411-457. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24714

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The Digital Archiving of Endangered Language Oral Traditions: Kaipuleohone at the University of Hawai‘i and C’ek’aedi Hwnax in Alaska

Author: Andrea L. Berez

Abstract: This essay compares and contrasts two small-scale digital endangered language archives with regard to their relevance for oral tradition research. The first is a university-based archive curated at the University of Hawai‘i, which is designed to house endangered language materials arising from the fieldwork of university researchers. The second is an indigenously-administered archive in rural Alaska that serves the language maintenance needs of the Ahtna Athabaskan Alaska Native community.

Citation: Berez, Andrea L. “The Digital Archiving of Endangered Language Oral Traditions: Kaipuleohone at the University of Hawai’i and C’ek’aedi Hwnax in Alaska.” Oral Tradition 28.2 (2013).

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A survey of current reproducibility practices in linguistics publications

Authors: Gawne, Lauren; Berez-Kroeker, Andrea L.; Kelly, Barbara; Heston, Tyler

Abstract: In order to move forward toward reproducible research in linguistics, we first need to know where we are now with regard to our practices for methodological clarity and data citation in publications. In this poster we share the results of a study of over 370 journal articles, dissertations, and grammars, which is taken as a sample of current practices in the field. The publications all come from a ten-year span. The journals were selected for broad coverage. Grammars included published grammars and dissertations written as grammars, with broad geographic coverage, both in terms of subject language and publisher or university.These publications are critiqued on the basis of transparency of data source, data collection methods, analysis, and storage. While we find examples of transparent reporting, most of the surveyed research does not include key metadata, methodological information, or citations that are resolvable to the data on which the analyses are based.

Citation: Gawne, Lauren; Berez-Kroeker, Andrea L.; Kelly, Barbara; Heston, Tyler.  (2017). “A survey of current reproducibility practices in linguistics publications.” Poster presented at the Linguistic Society of America annual meeting, 5-9 January 2017, Austin TX.

 

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The Open Access Movement and Activism for the “Knowledge Commons”

Author: Jackie Smith

Abstract: Over the last 25 years, the publication industry has seen a more than 70 percent growth in its scholarly content. Yet today, far fewer companies control the bulk of publication. By continuing to publish in traditional ways, sociologists are participating in the enclosure of the knowledge commons, whether we intend to or not. As the American Sociological Association begins its own OA journal, members need to be informed about the issues at stake. Many scholars may be attracted to the ideas and values behind OA. Yet, this means a fundamental re-thinking of the publishing industry and groups like the American Sociology Association that rely on revenues from publishing.

Citation: Smith, Jackie. (2014) “The Open Access Movement and Activism for the Knowledge Commons.” American Sociological Association Footnotes, May/June 2014.

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Reproducible research in descriptive linguistics: integrating archiving and citation into the postgraduate curriculum at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Author: Andrea L. Berez

Abstract: The notion of reproducible research has received considerable attention in recent years from physical scientists, life scientists, social and behavioural scientists, and computational scientists. Some readers will be familiar with the criterion of replicability as a tenet of good execution of the scientific method, in which sound scientific experiments or studies are those that can be recreated elsewhere leading to new data, and in which sound scientific claims are those that are confirmed by the new data in a replicated study.

Citation: Berez, A. (2015). Reproducible research in descriptive linguistics: integrating archiving and citation into the postgraduate curriculum at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. In A. Harris, N. Thieberger & L. Barwick (Eds.) ‘Research, records and responsibility: ten years of PARADISEC’ (pp. 39-51). Sydney: Sydney University Press.

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